September 2015

September 2015

  • Going Too Far Can Ruin a Good Thing by Fred Surgent
  • Hardrock
  • Grand Teton FKT Attempt by Andy Anderson
  • Racing While Injured by Ellie Greenwood
  • Beware the Shadow by Gary Dudney
  • Five Ultrarunner Faults by Zach Adams
  • Bittersweet but Not Unbearable by Errol “Rocket” Jones
  • Five Ultrarunner Faults by Zach Adams


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Recent Features

Jonas Buud approaches the finish with his victory wreath and the Kranskulla who presented it

Three Kings in Sweden: the 2015 UltraVasan 90K

Last week, I traveled to north-central Sweden to compete in the second annual UltraVasan 90K on Saturday morning, August 22. What follows is an account of my race but also the race history, the course, and the three kings on everyone’s mind as the weekend unfolded.

Gary Dudney

Give It a Rest

As hard charging, fiercely driven, superhero ultrarunners, we love to pile up the miles, train until we drop and skimp on rest days. But one of the great ironies about long-distance running is that the resting done between runs can be just as important

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Seven Year Cycles

An ultrarunning adage says that after you start the sport, you improve for seven consecutive years. Your body and mind need that much time to figure it all out and go from “just” completing the distances to racing them at peak levels. For me, this has held very true—2010 was my seventh year, and that’s when I had by far my best races at all distances, with personal bests in all six of them.

Old Timers’ Ultramarathon in Manchester (a Race for the Ages)

On Labor Day Weekend, the Fred Deadman Park in Manchester, Tennessee will play host to the greatest field of American ultramarathon runners ever assembled…. 30 years too late. In a unique format, where every runner is allotted the same number of hours

Ian Sharman

Racing in the Heat

As we get into the middle of summer, many races involve running in severely hot weather. The most experienced runners use several tricks to deal with this, which are most evident at two Californian races renowned for their searing heat—Western States 100 and Badwater 135.

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Quick & Dirty: Hillary Allen, 2015 Speedgoat 50K Winner

Hillary Allen, who sports the apropos moniker Hillygoat, has quickly risen to prominence in the ultrarunning world—especially in races with a lot of vertical. Though relatively new to running, the Colorado native has won several big name races, including this year’s Speedgoat 50K in 6:37:35.

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Completing Your First Ultra The Ultimate Running High

As youths we have visions of grandeur. We see ourselves accomplishing great goals and becoming outstanding athletes. We watch the Olympics and other sporting events and visualize ourselves standing on the podium receiving the accolades of our peers and the public. Somehow, time slips away, and before you know it you’re married, have kids, a job, a house payment, and those childhood dreams are just that… dreams.

12th Annual Virginia 24 Hour Run for Cancer

Despite the worst weather we’ve ever had in the 12 years of the race, this year’s Virginia 24 Hour Run for Cancer was still an amazing success! We set new race records for attendance, men’s winner, women’s winner, and Team winner, plus six new Virginia 24 Hour age group records!

An-'arriero'-goes-about-his-work-in-fluorescent-flecked-country-(photo-credit-Matt-Maynard)

Found in Translation Putaendo 100K, Chile

We were an hour outside of Putaendo, when the yerba maté started to take effect. It was June and deep mid winter. All that afternoon we had driven north towards the sun, which now was on its low drawling descent into the Pacific Ocean.

Dean Karnazes

Seconds Matter

Ultramarathon races take hours, days. What’s a few lost seconds, right? Wrong. Seconds really do matter. Let me share with you a little story that illustrates this point. The race wasn’t a traditional ultramarathon, but a multiday adventure race involving a variety of disciplines, which included running, mountain biking, paddling and rock climbing.

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Riding the Hot Desert Wind

Ride the Wind is a desert race through and through with cactus, kangaroo mice, wadis, coyotes, painted rocks, lizards, one hundred percent exposure, and a UV index that could strip paint off the space shuttle. Even the cactus was dying out there.

Listen To Your Body — What You Hear Might Surprise You

My non-running friends often ask me what it feels like to run a 100-miler. They find it difficult to imagine. I find it difficult to describe. Oxymoronic phrases like “Everything hurts, but I love it!” create more confusion than they clear up. I’ve been struggling to find a better way to get the message across. I think I finally found one.

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Living With an Ultrarunner It’s Not Always So Easy

Following are some conclusions I have drawn after being married to a running fanatic (Gary Johnson, who placed ninth in the 1991 Angeles Crest 100 Mile Run and who totaled 127 miles in the 1990 Megan’s 24 Hour Track Run among other feats of wonder) for five years, in the form of advice for the newly initiated who may not know what they’re in for.

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One Hundred Miles and the Marathon

Running Times published an article earlier this year entitled “Is 100 Miles The New Marathon?” That made me smile—so the rest of the running world has finally found our crazy little corner of the running world? Then I considered the absurdity of the no

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Chili Loading — The Answer to an Ultrarunner’s Problems

Stop laughing, this is no joke! Where did I get this secret? Well, it’s a long story and it goes back many years. You see, the historical and legendary Kit Carson was a great ultramarathon runner. Kit first introduced the concept of chili loading to a small band of Indians and ultrarunning cowboys while he was participating in a half-marathon.

Joe Fejes cruising, and styling,
during his record six-day run. Photo: Szilvia Oszi

Joe Fejes Sets New American Six-Day Mileage Record

This May, after falling just short of the magical 600-mile mark last year in Anchorage, AK, Joe Fejes became the first modern-day American to break the 600-mile barrier in six days at the EMU World Trophy races in Hungary. Zane Holscher caught up with Joe and obtained the following feedback and insights on his huge accomplishment.